cocktailsband:

and now to Stevie with this weekend’s forecast …

(Source: BuzzFeed, via blameaspartame)

youincolor:

Bob’s Burgers IMDB. This is the very last credit.

youincolor:

Bob’s Burgers IMDB. This is the very last credit.

(via laughterkey)

Patton Oswalt’s rendition of “Let it Go.”

(Source: hellotailor, via cognitivedissonance)

Touché, IMDB. 

Touché, IMDB. 

(Source: imdb.com)

felper:

vulpexinculto:

1°)    4.7 U.S.A

2°)    6.7 Chile

this is the most accurate description of my country

(via howinternet)

Elliott Smith - “Waltz #2” on SNL, 10/17/1998.

Found this on an old VHS.

“The secret, the evidence suggests, is that listening to music is an active process: We’re making the music in our heads as the sounds play our brains.”

The science of choruses and why repetition makes music powerful.

Pair with these 7 fantastic reads on music, emotion, and the brain, then seen this animated explanation of how music enchants the brain

(via explore-blog)

lickystickypickyshe:

A Portland family reported a domestic disturbance when their 22-pound Himalayan housecat, Lux, turned aggressive, forcing the mother, father, their 7-month-old baby, and their family dog to cower in the bathroom and call 911 for rescue.

 The man who called 911 told the dispatcher the cat “went over the edge,” and was charging at them every time they opened the door. Lee Palmer, his girlfriend, Teresa Barker and their son, Jesse, were taking cover in the bedroom.

"He’s trying to attack us," he said. "He’s very, very, very, very hostile."

911 operators confirmed the baby did not need medical attention before sending officers to the scene.

"The 911 operator stayed on the phone with the caller to ensure the family, including the dog, remained safe in the bedroom as the cat screeched in the background," a Portland Police Bureau press release states.

The responding officers snagged a dog snare to use in case it was needed to take the alleged cat criminal into custody.

The cat, named Lux, weighs 22 pounds.

When officers opened the door to the apartment, a black and white Himalayan darted into the kitchen, “attempting to flee custody,” police said.

The dog snare came in handy, as it was used to put the cat behind bars in a crate.

Officers then told the family it was safe to come out of the bedroom.

"The cat remained behind bars in the custody of the family, and officers cleared the scene and continued to fight crime elsewhere in the city," the Portland Police Bureau stated.

A motive for the feline’s frantic behavior has not been revealed. However, the man who called 911 told the dispatcher he had “kicked the cat in the rear” after it attacked the 7-month-old child. 

"He’s got kind of a history of violence," the caller told a 911 dispatcher. "He’s kind of a violent cat already. But he’s really bad right now."

By Monday, everything had calmed down. Lux was hiding under a blanket when a Fox 12 crew arrived at the scene.

"It’s only funny when it’s not happening to you," said Teresa Barker, with a laugh. "When this happens to you, I assure you, you will do the same thing."

(Source: wbtv.com, via pricklylegs)

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